P157
Philosophy in lusophone Africa
Convenor:
Anke Graness (University of Hildesheim)
Chair:
Dr. Anke Graness
Discussant:
Prof. Dr. Elisio Macamo
Location:
C5.09
Start time:
27 June, 2013 at 17:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

The target of our panel is to introduce concepts of philosophers (from history until today) of the lusophone region of Africa. It is a trial to correct a neglect that Portuguese-speaking African countries have suffered and to fill a gap in the history of philosophy in sub-Saharan Africa.

Long abstract:

Do you know a philosopher from the Portuguese-speaking part of Africa? Even among specialist in the philosophies of sub-Saharan Africa this question will mainly be answered negatively. Until today the discourse on African philosophy mainly focuses on the anglophone or francophone parts of Africa. The lusophone part is widely excluded. The target of our panel is to introduce concepts of philosophers (from history until today) of the Lusophone Africa. It is a trial to correct a neglect that Portuguese-speaking African countries have suffered and a trial to fill a gap in the history of philosophy in sub-Saharan Africa. The lusophone countries in Africa, even so different in history, cultures, geography, nature etc., share a history as former Portuguese colonies and a language. This makes it reasonable to focus on them as one region in the frame of a history of (philosophical) ideas. The following questions arise: How was and is philosophy done in lusophone Africa? Which philosophical traditions and methods are influential? What are the main topics? Is there an exchange of (philosophical) ideas with Brazil (or other parts of Latin America)? How are questions of acculturation, the national liberation struggle and its underlying concepts, questions concerning the postcolonial situation and its impact on philosophical thinking etc. discussed? Such questions have an eminent importance for the philosophy of today, especially for an intercultural philosophy. Requested for our panel are papers who explore work and life of philosophers (men and women) from lusophone regions of Africa in history and today.