P004
New players and management of natural resources
Convenors:
Stig Jensen (Copenhagen University)
Thorkil Casse (Rsokilde University)
Location:
C2.01
Start time:
28 June, 2013 at 10:30
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

The debate about green grabbing, defined as appropriation of land and resources for environmental ends, and transnational environmental governmentality,is sometimes heated, and often the role of the major players is left out in the discussion.

Long abstract:

The increasing importance of emerging markets such as Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, with their own cooperation agendas, limited resources and growth and far-reaching effects on climate change, food security and management of natural resources. Green grabbing, defined as appropriation of land and resources for environmental ends, and transnational environmental governmentality, where big NGOs are supposed to define the environmental agenda in African countries, are concepts used by critics of conservation. Who has the right or access to use natural resources, and who defines what kind of nature is exploited or set aside for conservation? Are outsiders' claims on defining the boundaries for exploitation vs conservation legitimate or are they signs of an emerging neo-liberal agenda? The debate is sometimes heated, and often the role of the major players is left out in the discussion. Are logging, expansion of agricultural cropping or fishing rights natural activities of local people or are the activities responding to the needs for food to man and domestic animals in emerging markets? The approach to balancing development and conservation needs differs between the new players. Conflicts are present in Russia and China, whereas fewer conflicts might be observed in India. Does the variation in approach to conflicts make a difference in the new players' approach to management of natural resources in Africa ?