C25
Global health collaborations and alignments

Convenors:
Nora Engel (Maastricht University)
Patricia Kingori (The Ethox Centre, University of Oxford)
Salla Sariola (University of Helsinki)
Catherine Montgomery (University of Oxford)
Stream:
Confluence, collaboration and intersection
Location:
FASS Building Meeting Room 2/3
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

The panel asks how and with what implications collaboration and alignment is practiced across the multiple and varied actors, places and practices involved in global health interventions and technologies.

Long abstract:

Global health offers analytical scope for STS as global health is characterized by entanglements, alignments and interactions between global and local factors transcending disciplinary, geographical, political, institutional, and sectoral boundaries. Moreover, global health is defined by desire to reduce health inequity in a variety of geographical locations. To reach this aim, considerable emphasis is put on collaborations and technologies including an array of actors, users, practices and settings, which in previous incarnations of global health, such as tropical and colonial medicine, were often peripheral to its focus and design. From community engagement to institutional collaborations with researchers and scientists aimed at knowledge transfer, data sharing and capacity building, numerous ethical, economic and logistical arguments are invoked to support global health encounters. This panel asks how this complexity is made to align against the historical backdrop of inequity and where the global north and its institutions continue to wield considerable power and resources. We are interested in critical engagements with examples of global health encounters which emphasize what happens in practice, how practices work in ways which reproduce or subvert inequity, and with what effects. We invite papers that examine, but are not limited to: -different ideas, implicated norms and practices in global health collaborations between scientists, communities, patients, professionals, policymakers, etc. -how collaboration and alignment matter in development of global health innovations, technologies, institutions, or networks - relationships between standardization and variability in global health encounters and alignment efforts - the role of STS scholars in these