Accepted Paper:

Feminist interventions and everyday struggles for the protection of Forest Sámi cultures against "environmental friendly" power production and other colonial and racist technoaggressions   

Authors:

May-Britt Öhman (Uppsala University)
Petri Storlöpare

Paper short abstract:

Highlights the everyday struggles of Henrik Andersson, a young Forest Sámi reindeer herder for Sámi culture against ongoing industrial exploitations and the threat of wind power and is also a Feminist/Indigenous technoscience challenge of colonial Swedish politics where Sámi voices are excluded.

Paper long abstract:

Representatives of the Swedish state commonly present Sweden as being in the global front regarding democracy, human rights and environmentally sustainability.

Meanwhile the Swedish state is performing genocide against its Indigenous people.

State supported/encouraged industrial exploitations such as mining, hydropower, forestry, windpower, militarization, roads and railroads is increasingly environmentally destroying Sámi territory, endangering the future for Sámi reindeer herding as well as all other Sámi traditional and local livelihoods.

A more than century long aggressive colonial racist policy has taken and continues to take its toll on Sámi communities and individuals as well as other local inhabitants. However, the Sámi have never given up.

This presentation provides insight into the everyday struggles of Henrik Andersson, a 35 year old Forest Sámi and reindeer herder of Gällivare Forest Sámi village, CEO of his own company where he also works with the building of traditional Sámi timber corals and goatje.

Andersson has worked with the strengthening of reindeer herding and other Sámi traditions since young age. A film and research project collaboration involving Andersson, filmmaker Petri Storlöpare and Dr. Öhman (also Forest Sámi), puts focus on the one hand Andersson's daily struggles to protect the important forests and lands for reindeer herding, in particular against the threat of wind power constructions by the state owned company Vattenfall and the private Vasavind. On the other hand the presentation is one out of Öhman's many Feminist/Indigenous technoscience interventions, challenging the colonial and racist Swedish energy politics where Sámi voices are strategically excluded.

Panel T100
Feminist Technoscience Studies in Unexpected Places: (Intra)Activism and Social Justice