Accepted paper:

Data Sense: People's Engagements with Their Personal Digital Data

Author:

Deborah Lupton (University of Canberra)

Paper short abstract:

In this presentation, I discuss some of my current work addressing personal digital data ontologies and practices. I draw on some theoretical perspectives that I am developing and illustrate these with a case study of a current research project looking at the digital self-tracking of cycling.

Paper long abstract:

In this presentation, I discuss some of my current work addressing personal digital data ontologies and practices. In so doing, I draw on some theoretical perspectives that I am developing on the following issues: the notions of 'lively devices' and 'lively data'; the personal digital data assemblage; and the concept of 'data sense', incorporating digital sensors, embodied human senses and human sense-making. The discussion will be illustrated using a case study of a current research project looking at the self-tracking of cycling trips using digital devices. The approach takes a digital sensory ethnographic approach, incorporating videoing people engaged in their habitual practices as well as talking to them, in the effort to uncover tacit or unspoken practices and routines. Our research questions focus on such aspects as: What are the affective and sensual dimensions of self-tracking cycling commutes? How do people interpret the sensations that they receive from their bodies about their rides in relation to the digital data that their devices sense for them? What do their senses tell them that their sensors do not (and vice versa)? How does human sense-making operate in this context? I outline the methods of the project and describe some findings from this project.

panel T102
Everyday analytics: The politics and practices of self-monitoring