T096
Emerging biotechnologies in psychiatry and clinical psychology
Convenors:
Torsten Voigt (Universit├Ąt Hamburg)
Jonas Rueppel (Goethe-University Frankfurt)
Stream:
Tracks
Location:
117b
Start time:
3 September, 2016 at 11:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

This track explores the use of biotechnologies in psychiatry or clinical psychology and analyses the social, ethical, political and legal dimensions. It aims at mapping out the practices and effects of the biologization, geneticization and the proclaimed personalization of psychiatry.

Long abstract:

New genetics and biotechnologies innovations have revolutionized medical practices as well as our understanding of health and illness in the past 3 decades. Novel genetic tools, biological tests and (neuro-)imaging technologies promise better diagnosis and treatment of diseases. The manifold consequences of emerging biotechnologies in the medicine have been described by social scientists in various fields and highly interesting case studies. Theoretically, they have been captured with concepts such as biomedicalization, geneticization, neurochemical selves, biosociality, personalization of medicine or biological citizenship. Interestingly, emerging biotechnologies are only rarely used in psychiatric practise. Despite claims that have been made since the decade of the brain in the 1990s, that is to say the aim that the 5th revision of the DSM would be entirely based on neurobiological markers, the diagnosis of mental disorders still relies on questionnaires and supposedly subjective assessments by mental health professionals. The treatment with psychiatric medications still mostly follows the principal of trial and error. This panel invites papers that explore the use of biotechnologies in psychiatry or clinical psychology and analyse the social, ethical, political and legal dimensions. It aims at mapping out the practices and effects of the biologization, geneticization and the proclaimed personalization of psychiatry and clinical psychology. Proposals could address the historical development of these technologies, specific research settings and uses in psychiatry and clinical psychology as well as the implications of the application of biomedical knowledge in these fields.