Click the star to add/remove an item to/from your individual schedule.
You need to be logged in to avail of this functionality.

P378


Infrastructuring care at the margins 
Convenor:
Firaz Peer (University of Kentucky)
Send message to Convenor
Format:
Traditional Open Panel

Short Abstract:

This panel is being organized to explore the often neglected or under-reported forms of work, politics, power, privilege, values, voice, relationships, resistance that manifest when infrastructuring care for marginalized communities.

Long Abstract:

Information and communication technologies (ICT’s) are being integrated into care infrastructures, with the hope that they might help reduce costs, improve efficiency, and provide more timely services at scale. But such integrations come at a cost and are shaping how marginalized communities, like trans and non-binary people (Wilcox et al., 2023), refugees (Bell, 2018), older adults (Klakegg et al., 2017), women (Bagalkot et al., 2022; Mustafa et al., 2020), children (Karusala et al., 2023), racial, ethnic, and religious minorities (Mustafa et al., 2021; Sultana et al., 2019) navigate the healthcare infrastructures to gain access to care services. Further, these ICT’s have brought additional scrutiny and impacted the kinds of work that healthcare workers do (Ismail et al., 2022; Ismail & Kumar, 2019; S P et al., 2022). Scholars have argued that the enactment of care is always political as it is associated with asymmetrical power relations between those who care and those who are being cared for within care infrastructures (Boone et al., 2023; Martin et al., 2015), and are calling for us to be reflexive and pay attention to the “often-neglected voices, objects, and interests, while staying accountable to the politics, power, and privilege involved in such work” (Light & Akama, 2014). It is in this spirit of being reflexive that this panel is being organized, to explore the often neglected or under-reported forms of work, politics, power, privilege, values, voice, relationships, resistance that manifest when infrastructuring care at the margins.

Accepted papers: