Click the star to add/remove an item to/from your individual schedule.
You need to be logged in to avail of this functionality.

P334


The work of collaboration 
Convenors:
Katharina Schramm (University of Bayreuth)
Amiel Bize (Cornell University)
Send message to Convenors
Format:
Combined Format Open Panel

Short Abstract:

This panel explores research collaboration as an epistemological, political, ethical, and methodological question. We envision it as a hopeful investigation of collaboration, but one that does not shy away from thinking through its difficulties.

Long Abstract:

If research is meant to make a difference in the world, collaboration is key. To this end, research collaborations may range from very pragmatic to highly idealistic projects. Yet even the most carefully designed collaborations are not free of power relations, unpredictable dynamics, and divergent stakes. Collaboration entails constant work: both to enact and to rigorously and critically evaluate. This panel explores research collaboration as an epistemological, political, ethical, and methodological question. We envision it as a hopeful investigation of collaboration, but one that does not shy away from thinking through its difficulties.

To propose collaboration—particularly when it aims to reimagine conventional roles like “researcher,” “community member,” “stakeholder,” etc—is also to claim the possibility of research as a shared space of inquiry and action. We are drawn to the strong critiques of social science research emerging from Indigenous and environmental justice movements, among others, which have brought important attention to "relational accountability" (Wilson 2008) and proposed methodological and practical interventions that include various forms of citizen science (Liboiron 2021), “desire-centered” (Tuck 2009), and community “useful” research (Tuhiwai Smith 1999).

These frameworks urge us to confront the epistemological questions raised by research across difference, alongside the material and representational inequalities that continue to feature in many research settings. How do we foreground and navigate the political goals and demands that collaborative research can make possible, perhaps even when these are not fully shared? What work needs to be done to prepare for and adjust collaboration, and what do we do when collaborations don’t go well? Who actually bears the burden of collaboration’s labor? And how do we ensure that collaborations don’t exacerbate extractivist research logics?

We invite contributions in a variety of formats (including academic presentation, film, dialogue, exercises, etc) that consider collaboration in all its complexity.

Accepted contributions: