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P304


Theorizing through the mundane: storying transformations in healthcare 
Convenors:
Lisa Lindén (Chalmers University of Technology)
Sonja Jerak-Zuiderent (Amsterdam University Medical Centres)
Anna Mann (University of Zurich)
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Format:
Combined Format Open Panel

Short Abstract:

In this panel, we want to draw upon a rich tradition of STS accounts on ‘the mundane’ to empirically investigate, think about and experiment with how theorizing through ‘the mundane’ allows STS scholars to relate to and intervene in ‘transformations’ in healthcare.

Long Abstract:

As a ‘big story’ concern, transformations in healthcare abound: digitalization, the rise of big data, personalized and patient-centred care, the feminization of medicine, increasing health inequalities and growing scarcity of personnel are but a few examples. In this panel we are interested in responding to such ‘big story’ concerns in healthcare by theorizing through ‘the mundane’.

STS has a long tradition – with different beginnings – of attending to and theorizing through ‘the mundane’. Think about for example the mundaneness of infrastructural work (Bowker and Star 1999), the fleetingly subtle ‘here-and-now’ (Verran 1999), the everydayness of marginalizing ‘invisible work’ (Star/Strauss 1989) and Latour’s doorstopper (Johnson/Latour 1988). More recently, it has been central to ‘care studies’ and ‘maintenance and repair studies’ marked through an attention to ‘daily life matters’ and ‘tinkering’ (Mol et al. 2010), ‘exnovation’ (Mesman 2008), ‘everyday ethics’ (Pols 2023), the easily devalued as ethico-political commitment (Puig de la Bellacasa 2011), and overlooked situations that take place in interstices of routine and breakdown (Denis et al. 2015).

In this panel, we want to draw upon and extend these rich STS accounts on ‘the mundane’ to empirically investigate, think about and experiment with how STS scholars can relate to and intervene in ‘transformations’ in healthcare.

We welcome presentations empirically focusing on healthcare with a format either experimenting with ’storying and transformations’ and/or exploring questions such as:

• What counts as ‘mundane’ in particular situations, sites, practices of healthcare?

• How does an attention to ‘the mundane’ allow us to transform ‘big stories’ about current transformations in healthcare?

• How does ‘the mundane’ allow us to attend to modes of living and dying well?

• How to stay attentive to asymmetrical configurations and the non-innocence of ‘the mundane’?

• How does the lens of the mundane transform and extend STS theorizing?

Accepted contributions: