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P135


Digital transformations of diagnosis and diagnostic moments 
Convenor:
Ricky Janssen (Maastricht University)
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Chair:
Nora Engel (Maastricht University)
Discussant:
Pierre-Marie DAVID (Université de Montréal)
Format:
Traditional Open Panel

Short Abstract:

This panel will attend to questions of normativity, valuation and method around digital transformations of diagnosis. We welcome contributions from papers on AI and other forms of digital technology developed to diagnose disease or support diagnostic moments.

Long Abstract:

In the context of medical testing, where time and resource constraints are constant challenges, research institutions and industry actors aim to create diagnostic technologies that can act quickly, simply, or even autonomously to provide test results for various health conditions. Through the introduction of new digital diagnostic technologies, such as self-testing apps and AI-based computer aided detection systems, diagnostic practices transform. Through this transformation, diagnosis may no longer require the seeing, listening, touching or clinical judgement of a healthcare professional, but rather, relies on software algorithms attuned to specific settings for accuracy. At the same time, the diagnostic itself changes and transforms through software updates and recalibration for specific settings. These transformations require resources, which may be scarce or unavailable.

This panel will attend to, among others, questions of normativity, valuation and method around digital transformations of diagnosis. We welcome contributions from papers on AI and other forms of digital technology developed to diagnose disease or support diagnostic moments. Mobilizing STS sensibilities to understand how these technologies are shaped by, and shape, the social, material and political worlds in which they work, we invite papers related (but not limited) to questions addressing:

What should digital diagnostic care and practice entail?

What socio-material practices are involved in digital diagnoses?

What do different actors value when designing, implementing and using digital technology for diagnosis?

How is diagnostic confidence constructed and how might this be altered in the context of digital diagnostic technology?

What are these digital technologies made to diagnose?

What values are being generated through these diagnostic transformations for health care and practice?

How should digital diagnostic technology be designed, implemented and used to support equity in access and care?

How do we understand, study and “test” new testing/diagnostic technologies when the practices around them and technologies themselves are changing?

Accepted papers: