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P114


Why/why not? Creative making, doing, and the (non)generation of knowledge: models, frictions, cases 
Convenors:
Chris Salter (Zurich University of the Arts)
Philippe Sormani (Zurich University of the Arts (ZHdK))
Alice Jarry (Concordia University)
Bart Simon (Concordia University)
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Format:
Combined Format Open Panel

Short Abstract:

With a combined format, we invite STS scholars, creative makers, emerging scholar-creators, policy experts and publics to contribute to an important discussion concerning the continued tension on the role/production of artistic objects within a natural, social and human-scientific research context

Long Abstract:

Over the last twenty years, art and design in collaboration with technoscience have increasingly become a focus in STS (Salter, et al 2017; Borgdorff et al 2020; Rogers et al 2022). Yet, there are still fundamental epistemological, ontological, aesthetic and ethical issues concerning the role and production of artistic objects within a natural, social and human-scientific research context. As Rheinberger (2019) writes, a core tension is less to do with the “production of epistemic and artistic values” and more with “stabilization on the levels of social negotiation, communication and distribution” of knowledge. More broadly, these tensions cut across multiple areas: (1) the rise of so-called “artistic research” in the context of the neo-liberal university and the lack of shared methodological techniques; (2) rhe tension between making and reflexivity (i.e., practitioners lack reflexive distance) (3) the interest in STS in forms of speculation and “objectual thinking” (Knorr Cetina 2021); (4) the unresolved tension between discursive-critique of techno-scientific “imbroglios” (i.e., AI, Climate Transformation, the More-than-Human, and post-colonial multi-perspectivism) and the production of non-discursive aesthetic objects that address these issues; (5) the difficulties of “interdisciplinary” peer review between creative and scientific thinking, and (6) the “transfer” of such knowledge to non-academic audiences or publics versus the “making public” of such knowledge with publics in particular (Michael 2009). With a combined format, we invite STS scholars, creative makers, emerging scholar-creators, policy experts and publics to contribute concrete case studies (via images, texts, interventions, manifestos, sounds, rewrites of policy docs, workshops). Case studies should probe particular settings, instigate “public experiments” (Born & Barry 2013) or run across different sites, scales and objects. The combined format invites contributions engaging with the epistemic politics of creative practices standing in tension with critical discursive moves in a more than human world.

Accepted contributions: