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P064


Getting post-carbon transformations “right”: knowledge, modernity, and temporality in the age of the nuclear (energy) u-turn 
Convenors:
Stephanie Postar (London School of Economics and Political Science)
Sarah O'Brien (The University of Manchester)
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Format:
Combined Format Open Panel

Short Abstract:

This open panel explores the social, political, and ecological ramifications of what we call “the nuclear u-turn”: the recent move by states, activists, industry, and others towards backing nuclear energy as a mainstream solution to our current energy predicament.

Long Abstract:

This open panel explores what we call “the nuclear U-turn”: the recent move by states, activists, industry, and others towards backing nuclear energy as a mainstream solution to our current energy predicament. With some climate activists vocally supporting nuclear as a low carbon energy source, across the world old questions (i.e., about the safety and longevity of nuclear infrastructures and waste) join with new questions (i.e., about whether nuclear energy belongs in a post-carbon world, who are the key stakeholders in nuclear landscapes, and how or which countries are positioning themselves to join this nuclear energy club). We are interested in research broadly engaging with the politics of science, knowledge, and “truth” in the nuclear world. We are also keen to examine the multiple temporalities that mark and orient nuclearised landscapes - timescales that can be stretched and extended, whilst also shortened and urgent. Also, we invite contributions interrogating how people build livelihoods in nuclearised areas, and if it matters to them whether or not these areas are nuclearised.

We welcome contributions that attend to or put into dialogue various scales of transformation: the intimate and the personal, and the structural and systemic. This could mean, for instance, looking at (inter)national nuclear policies and aspirations for the nuclear sector, or intergenerational differences in historically nuclearised areas and how this might now be shifting. We encourage individual and collective submissions from a range of disciplines. Submissions can be experimental, alternative, participatory, speculative, and in non-traditional paper formats, such as multimedia and performance.

Accepted contributions: