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P018


Caring in an overflowing terrestrial 
Convenors:
Bert de Graaff (Erasmus University Rotterdam)
Robert Borst (Erasmus University Rotterdam)
Roland Bal (Erasmus University Rotterdam)
Karin van Vuuren (ESHPM, Erasmus University Rotterdam)
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Chair:
Bert de Graaff (Erasmus University Rotterdam)
Format:
Traditional Open Panel

Short Abstract:

We welcome contributions that explore practices of caring in relation to environmental crises and disasters. We are interested in how caring makes us attentive to the work, emotions, and politics that, together, enact emergencies and disasters, including our responses to them.

Long Abstract:

The risks and uncertainties enveloped in the climate crisis and terrestrial transformations are increasingly felt through emergencies and disasters such as floods, pandemics, and wildfires. These acute crises underscore the vulnerabilities and interdependencies through which we “maintain, continue and repair ‘our world’ so that we can (all) live in it as well as possible” (Fisher & Tronto, 1991, p.40). In this panel we invite contributions that conceptually and empirically explore practices of caring in relation to environmental crises, disasters, and other societal overflows. Instead of conceptualising such practices as those of resilience or preparedness, as the crisis literature generally does, we are interested in exploring how caring – as a committed speculative sensitivity (Puig de la Bellacasa, 2017), makes us attentive to the work, emotions, and politics that, together, enact emergencies and disasters, including our responses to them. For instance, we want to discuss how we can move beyond the logics of control and early warnings (Rhodes & Lancaster, 2023) to explore the longue durée and sociotechnical-transformative nature of emergencies and disasters. What traces do caregivers leave behind when they move on? What remains when the acutely wounded have been treated, and the evaluations have been drawn up? We invite inquiries that are sensitive to inequities that are produced through discourses of preparedness and resilience, whilst focusing on the situated, experiential, nature(s) of caring and being cared for in times of crisis. We particularly welcome contributions that explore the concept of ‘(over)flowing’ in relation to caring, affectivity, and sociotechnical-transformations in times of crisis.

Accepted papers: