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P134
Energy production, environment, and human rights in the context of climate change
Convenors:
Elisabeth Moolenaar (Regis University)
Ana Isabel Afonso (FCSH-Universidade Nova de Lisboa CICS.NOVA)
Dorle Dracklé (University of Bremen)
Format:
Panels
Time zone:
UTC+1
Sessions:
Friday 24 July, 11:00-12:45, 14:00-15:45

Short abstract:

This panel locates environmental justice, human rights, and/or climate change within ethnographic research on energy production & consumption and resource extraction. It investigates these matters for populations affected, from the perspective of the researcher, and/or as they inform each other.

Long abstract:

One of the goals of the "energy anthropology" is placing energy and the environment in cultural perspective, taking into account meaning (making), relationships, value, and agency. Using ethnography/ethnographic research on energy production can open up a dialogue on urgent matters such as environmental justice, human rights and climate change. This panel deals with struggles over energy production, debates over climate change, and the politics of natural resource extraction within broader socio-cultural contexts. Energy landscapes are sites of power and control. These sites frequently face environmental degradation, ecological disasters, and/or social disintegration or upheaval. Sites of energy production are oftentimes located in less urban areas far away from the sites where most energy is consumed, turning the former into "sacrifice zones." Local (at times indigenous) populations are most vulnerable because they have acquired less entitlement to the natural resources, through law, economic and political systems, and/or processes of colonization. Energy production affects not only environmental quality but also human rights. Without a livable environment, human rights may become either unachievable or meaningless. Energy production intensifies challenges to populations who are unable to claim rights such as the right to self-determination, sovereignty, or mineral or traditional land rights. We welcome papers that locate environmental justice, human rights, and/or climate change within ethnographic explorations of energy production & consumption and natural resource extraction. Papers might investigate these matters for populations affected by energy production, from the perspective of the researcher, and/or as they inform each other.