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R011
Shifting Horizons: Anthropology and STS in the 21st Century
Convenors:
Joseph Bosco (Washington University in St Louis)
Sung-Joon Park (Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg)
Format:
Roundtables
Time zone:
UTC+1
Sessions:
Thursday 23 July, 11:00-12:45

Short abstract:

This roundtable engages science and technology and the ways it dis/orders, dis/connects, and trans/forms human life and ecology worldwide, and thus calls for epistemic-technological concern from the critical anthropologist.

Long abstract:

This roundtable engages science and technology and the ways it dis/orders, dis/connects, and trans/forms human life and ecology worldwide, and thus calls for epistemic-technological concern from the critical anthropologist. While neoliberalism is naturalizing capitalism, colonialism, patriarchy and ecological destruction as the only viable alternative, it has also introduced planetary shifts that are tied up with movements of people, epistemologies, and science and technologies. Today more than ever, these shifts create temporal but exclusive epistemic-technological centers and at the same time eliminate hegemonic operation of any center. These worldwide movements have come to unsettle epistemic domination and the center/periphery binary. Without circulating and constantly shifting technologies and without a future designed by technoscience, it seems impossible to imagine our social life. The questions the roundtable thus brings to the fore are: How are we approaching the contradictory and transformative effects and the "messiness" of science and technology? How are we dealing with epistemological pluralism that calls the very idea of science and technology - as sign of global modernity, progress and the "good life" - into question, without repeating epistemic domination? How do our interventions in the lived world interrupt the way science and technology and technologism dis/organize and dis/orient the world, and contribute to neoliberal globalization with radical ecological consequences? The roundtable brings together members of Law, Organization, Science and Technology (LOST) and Sci-Tech Asia Research Network to reflect on these questions and on how anthropology of science and technology is confronting theoretical/methodological challenges of the future.