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P010a
Animate Mobilities: Troubling Social, Ecological and Biological Boundaries [HOLB network panel]
Convenors:
Aníbal Arregui (University of Barcelona)
Sara Asu Schroer (University of Oslo)
Bettina Stoetzer (MIT)
Discussant:
Paolo Gruppuso (University of Gastronomic Sciences, Pollenzo)
Format:
Network affiliated Panels
Time zone:
UTC+1
Sessions:
Tuesday 21 July, 14:00-15:45

Short abstract:

Plants, fungi, animals and microorganisms often disregard human-made and imagined boundaries. We welcome proposals that engage with the ways in which the unruly mobilities of animate beings trouble boundaries of human world making: national borders, ecological habitats, and biological taxa.

Long abstract:

Plants, fungi, animals and microorganisms often disregard human-made and imagined boundaries: They spread in plantations, traverse fences, cross national borders, enter new landscapes and move beyond plan. In this panel we address how animate mobilities trouble and co-create geopolitical, ecological and even taxonomic boundaries. In particular, we aim to explore how nonhuman disobedient movements challenge divisory lines that serve as typical orderings of human world making: national borders, ecological habitats, and biological taxa. How do animate mobilities not only transform interspecies relations but also remake boundaries among humans and between species? Scholars have started to pay attention to human perception of animal movements as well as to animal's own subjective experience of spatial mobility (Hodgetts and Lorimer 2018; Schroer 2019). Taking that thread, this panel examines the ways in which 'the animate' —not only the animal—poses new challenges to ethnographic practice: first, animate world making relates to a lively movement which includes other scales, rhythms and logics of movement beyond those of animals —plant growth, virus spreading, spore travel, etc. (Myers 2019; Stoetzer 2018). Second we revisit 'animate worlds' as a dimension through which anthropologists have classically approached nonhuman agency beyond a divide between nature/culture, one of the constitutive boundaries of Western rationales (Haraway 2008; Ingold 2011; Tsing 2015). With focus on unruly nonhuman movements across boundaries, we welcome proposals that engage with the myriad ways in which animate mobilities may trouble and remake biological, ecological and social orderings.