Click on a panel/paper star to add/remove this to your individual schedule.
You need to be logged in to avail of this functionality.

P180
Shared marginal experiences? Comparing postcolonial memories from the European margins
Convenors:
Piera Rossetto (University of Graz)
Elsa Peralta (Center for Comparative Studies - Faculty of Arts, University of Lisbon)
Huw Halstead (University of St Andrews)
Format:
Panels
Time zone:
UTC+1
Sessions:
Wednesday 22 July, 11:00-12:45, 14:00-15:45

Short abstract:

The panel brings together scholars working on postcolonial memories by subjects at the 'European margins' (social, cultural, or geographical) in the second half of the 20th century with the aim of questioning the (presumed) peculiarities of different ethno-national experiences by comparing them.

Long abstract:

If colonial legacies are not a new research interest in anthropology, it is nevertheless important to recognize how in recent years anthropologists have engaged more and more in "exploring the various ways the colonial (and the pre-colonial) past is negotiated, contested, reinvented, reinterpreted, forgotten or denied by the various heirs" (De L'Estoile 2008: 277) in our contemporary societies. The anthropological approach appears a particularly suitable one to foster the proximity of memory studies and postcolonial studies and to further implement their 'cross-fertilisation.' The re-elaboration of the colonial legacies as they live in postcolonial performances of memories and identities is a cultural and social process that developed unevenly across Europe. While a "multidirectional model attuned to the transnational and the transcultural politics of memory" (Rothberg 2013: 361) is much encouraged, the aim of the panel is also to assess the (presumed?) peculiarities of distinctive ethno-national experiences of postcolonial subjects by comparing their (in)visibility in the public-national space, their construction of a sense of belonging to different spaces/cultures/identities, and their experience of citizenship as a lived category.