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P128


Offshore citizenship: Margins, enclaves, exclaves, and citizenship messiness in Europe and beyond
Convenors:
Theodoros Rakopoulos (University of Oslo)
Brian Campbell (University of Plymouth)
Format:
Panels
Sessions:
Thursday 23 July, 8:30-10:30, 11:00-13:00 (UTC+1)

Short abstract:

This panel invites papers on the vicissitudes of citizenship today in and around "Europe" and beyond. We particularly welcome contributions on what we term "offshore citizenship" - the condition in which citizenship takes place "elsewhere", beyond the confines of the state.

Long abstract:

This panel invites papers on the vicissitudes of citizenship today in and around "Europe" and beyond. We particularly welcome contributions on what we term "offshore citizenship" - the condition in which citizenship takes place beyond the confines of the state. Offshore sites could be seen as tricksters: they belong and do not belong, they stand on the friction of full recognition and ambivalence, and they escape most people's immediate attention (hence we mobilise the idea of "margins"). Offshore citizenship is then a broad term for citizenship happening "elsewhere". European examples include: European postcolonial countries like Malta and Cyprus engaged in selling their own (and thus the EU's) passport to an international market; the place citizenship in Brexit Britain or British offshoots in Europe and the world, like Gibraltar; the French "overseas" territories; the "European" shipping industry. We are particularly inspired by the vernacular ways that societies might construct citizenship - ways that do not always square with those held by their states. Such formations of citizenship are accompanied by an array of practices that side-line the classic classifications of citizen-making. We are thus principally interested in the messy shapings of contemporary citizenship, which allow for: tax-evasion nomadism, European "identity" ideologies, visa and passport acquisition in a global market, non-EU sites where EUrope is an everyday stake, as well as enclave and exclave citizenship belonging in, of, and out of Europe. The panel will also highlight how notions of accountability and control, so central to conventional citizenship, are side-lined by offshoring.