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P117
Temporal Horizons in Development and Humanitarian Interventions: Traces, 'Afterlives', and Unintended Consequences
Convenors:
Andrea Steinke (Centre for Humanitarian Action)
Yonatan N. Gez (University of Konstanz)
Discussant:
Dr. Kathrin Knodel
Format:
Panels
Time zone:
UTC+1
Sessions:
Friday 24 July, 11:00-12:45, 14:00-15:45

Short abstract:

This panel will discuss the material and symbolic legacies of development and humanitarian interventions in the global South in relation to multiple temporal horizons, problematizing the 'afterlives' of development interventions.

Long abstract:

This panel will discuss the material and symbolic legacies of development and humanitarian interventions in the global South in relation to multiple temporal horizons. Emphasizing the continuous resonance of past interventions as inspired by Ann Laura Stoler's (2013) emphasis on 'ruination' over 'ruins', the panel will be built around the recognition of humanitarian and development interventions as "an ongoing socially-constructed and negotiated process that goes beyond the time/space frames of intervention programmes" (Long 2001, 4). Panel participants will draw on a variety of empirical studies from the global South to address the temporalities of development and humanitarian interventions from a number of possible perspectives. Presenters may, for example, focus on "temporal 'disjunctures'" (Lewis 2016, 85) between beneficiaries' local memories and agencies' forward-looking, optimistic optics geared towards social transformation. Presenters may similarly consider the shifting sentiments and memories of bygone interventions by various stakeholders, as well as the interplay between multiple such interventional layers over time, in contexts of sense- and claim making. Lastly, presenters may draw on alleged differences in temporal conceptions within the development and humanitarian sectors, for example with regard to the immediacy of aid and the role—or absence—of long-term planning. Through such and related approaches to temporality, the panel will shed light in particular on the unintended long-term consequences of humanitarian and development interventions, and hopes to contribute to the problematization of defining success and failure within these sectors.