P160
Sense and sensibility: investments of emotion and rationality in the charting of future scenarios

Convenors:
Christina Garsten (Stockholm University)
Melissa Fisher (University of Copenhagen)
Jakob Krause-Jensen (Aarhus University)
Anette Nyqvist (Stockholm University)
Stream:
Panels
Location:
SO-F289
Start time:
14 August, 2018 at 10:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

The panel invites contributions on ethnographic investigations of the ways in which processes of anticipation and foresight in organizations are invested with emotions and rationalities, and how these are cultivated and drawn upon to mobilize and create a sense of direction.

Long abstract:

Charting futures has become an important activity for organizations striving to stay in tune with contemporary developments and to chart, design and shape present and future actions. Organizations-both public and private-employ a wide range of sophisticated tools, methods and models (metrics, indexes, forecasting and scenarios) in their efforts to imagine possibilities, estimate probabilities, sketch trajectories, and frame choices - to move ahead. Not least, they invest such processes with a range of emotions: fear, hope, urgency, shame, bewilderment, and confidence, to mention a few. The panel invites contributions from both senior and junior scholars (including master and doctoral students) currently involved in ethnographic investigations of the ways in which processes of anticipation and foresight in organizations are invested with emotions and rationalities, and how these are cultivated and drawn upon to mobilize and create a sense of direction. We wish to engage in discussions of the varieties of emotions and rationalities that undergird the future modelling of the vast range of experts who deal in foretelling and forecasting. We work from the assumption that the processes of charting of geopolitical future scenarios are invested with such constellations of emotions and rationalities. Indeed, the charting of global futures to a large extent involves the making of a 'geopolitics of emotion.' Our perceptions of what constitutes 'global problems', 'global solutions', 'desirable futures', and the best ways of moving ahead into the future, are to a large extent shaped by both sense and sentiment.