P116
Youth and indigeneity on the move: mobilities, transcultural knowledge, and sustainability

Convenors:
Fina Carpena-Mendez (University of Gdansk)
Pirjo Kristiina Virtanen (University of Helsinki)
Stream:
Panels
Location:
SO-B315
Start time:
14 August, 2018 at 10:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel addresses ethnographic investigations of youth and indigeneity in their intersections with mobility and displacement, as well as their impacts on knowledge transmission and innovation, personhood and relatedness, and cultural and environmental sustainability.

Long abstract:

Despite historical evidence of geographical mobility and cultural exchange at the root of Indigenous ways of seeing and being in the world, the colonial structures of domination that imposed immobility and racial boundaries shaped a long tradition of anthropological depictions of Indigenous peoples as rooted in place and caught up in cultural replication. Yet, the recent ethnographic record has indicated that children and youth are relevant social actors who negotiate their Indigeneity. While struggles to protect territories and attachment to local places remain key aspects of contemporary Indigenous politics and identities, the last historical round of colonial globalization through the spread of neoliberal capitalism has set the context for the translocal re-articulation of being and becoming Indigenous. Processes of transmigration, transculturation, and subaltern cosmopolitanism invite us to rethink indigeneity in the contemporary world. Novel processes of transnational migration of Indigenous communities in the last decades have become youth processes. Simultaneously, youth has emerged as a distinct social and political category in Indigenous communities. This has important consequences for the continuity of knowledge transmission and control of local natural resources. This panel addresses ethnographic investigations of youth and indigeneity in their intersections with mobility and displacement, as well as their impacts on knowledge transmission and innovation, personhood and relatedness, and cultural and environmental sustainability. In so doing, it seeks to explore the contributions of the ethnography of Indigenous youthhood to broader debates in the anthropology of global youth cultures.