P111
Mobilities, inequalities, power

Convenors:
Kristín Loftsdóttir (University of Iceland)
Unnur Dís Skaptadóttir (University of Iceland)
Brigitte Hipfl (Klagenfurt University)
Location:
U6-12
Start time:
20 July, 2016 at 14:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel looks at power in terms of how particular subjects are made 'possible' and gain legitimacy by asking how globalized inequalities in Europe produce and/or are contested by diverse forms of mobilities.

Long abstract:

With mobility becoming a key issue for anthropology in the present, it has become acute to understand how power runs through different ways of being mobile and discourses depicting mobilities. In Europe, the Schengen Agreement is for example predicated on categories of mobility that overlap with distinctions of geography and class (Garner 2007). Also, with asylum seekers and refugees taking the center stage in discussions about potential risks to the nation-state (Fassin 2011), the legal interpretation of these categories renders certain mobilities as 'illegal' while other types such as the tourist and the expatriate are welcomed and desired. In such light it can be asked to what extent migration in the present is linked to "the legacy of different colonial empires" (Ponzanezi 2002). In this panel, we look at power in terms of how particular subjects are made 'possible' and how they gain legitimacy, by asking how globalized inequalities in Europe produce or are contested by diverse forms of mobilities. How is racism of the past evident in current flow of people, objects and ideas? What is the underlying logic of the current regulation of mobility in the EU? How are different kinds of migrants categorized in terms of their desirability or perceived ability to adapt or integrate and what are its temporal dimensions? In which ways does the entanglement of race, class and gender result in specific patterns of mobility? How are different lines of mobility entangled in different economic circuits?