P065
Reassembling the visual: from visual legacies to digital futures [VANEASA]

Convenors:
Catarina Alves Costa (Universidade Nova de Lisboa)
Roger Canals (University of Barcelona)
Julia Binter (University of Oxford)
Format:
Panels
Location:
U6-1B
Start time:
21 July, 2016 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Since its beginnings, Anthropology has taken an interest in visuality. Still, this has not produced any unified field of research but rather a multiplicity of areas seen as disconnected. This panel welcomes researches aiming to integrate different aspects of the visual in anthropology.

Long abstract:

Anthropology's interest in visuality has produced a multiplicity of areas that have been seen as disconnected: the study of visual culture (religious images, tattoos, art craft and so on), the use of visual methods (photography, cinema, video, drawings) and of visual means for anthropological writing (photo essays, ethnographic cinema, webpages and the like), the interest in the act of seeing (a leading force for the anthropology of the senses emergence), and, finally, the reflection on what has been called "regimes of visibility", that is, the aspects of reality each culture openly shows and those that remain unseen. We strongly believe that now it is time to discuss ways to reassemble the visual within anthropology. Besides this, we assume that its urgent to reconnecting the visual with the discipline as a whole and, therefore, with the major theoretical and methodological and political challenges that it has to face. Indeed, the study of the visual and the production of visual materials must be reintegrated within the discipline: visuality should not be considered a specialization nor a subfield, as the so-called "visual anthropology" has been often regarded, but a structural element of the anthropological endeavor. This panel welcomes researches aiming to integrate different aspects of visual in anthropology in an innovative way to give answer both to the questions posed by our contemporary world - in which images are so crucial-, and to the classical theoretical problems of our discipline.