P048
Moving beyond the colonial? North-South mobility, power and post-colonial encounters [ANTHROMOB]

Convenors:
Lisa Åkesson (University of Gothenburg)
Pétur Waldorff (Nordic Africa Institute/University of Iceland)
Location:
U6-38
Start time:
21 July, 2016 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel explores European human mobility towards its former colonies, and analyses encounters between the migrant ex-colonizer and the native ex-colonized. It focuses on power relations and identities, and examines how these are related to continuities and ruptures with the colonial past.

Long abstract:

European human mobility towards its former colonies has increased over the last years, driven by many factors. Some of these Europeans are labour migrants searching for employment and a stable income. Others move in hope of economic profit, upward social mobility, or adventure. Still others aspire to leave behind difficult life situations or achieve a better quality of life. Many of these North-South migrants follow trajectories leading them to spaces that formerly were colonized by the migrant's country of origin. These movements sometimes take place against a background of globally changing economic power relations, with recession in parts of Europe and economic growth in former colonies. This panel focuses on encounters between the migrant ex-colonizer and the native ex-colonized in the wake of these new movements. In particular it welcomes papers that discuss changing power relations and identities, and explore how these are related to continuities and ruptures with the colonial past. Thus, the panel links up with the anthropological tradition of studying (post)colonial transformations and shifting power relations. The panel is also open for papers discussing the integration of migrants from the global North into countries of destination in the Global South, as well as papers exploring these migrants' potential contributions to social, political and economic development. Theoretically, the panel aims to combine post-colonial perspectives with research on the migration-development nexus and on integration. In relation to post-colonial studies, the panel moves beyond the traditional focus on continuities, and also explores emerging ruptures with the past.