P001
Anthropology of the "New Arab Man"

Convenors:
Nefissa Naguib (University of Oslo)
Marcia Inhorn (Yale University)
Format:
Panels
Location:
U6-21
Start time:
20 July, 2016 at 14:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Global forces are challenging and expanding the boundaries of what it means to be a man in the Middle East today. The panel will discuss the future of the conceptual character of the Muslim "man question" through the lens of marriage, family, and community life.

Long abstract:

Thinking about the "man question" in anthropology and masculinities in the Middle East has recently provided important changes in our understanding of male aspirations and practices, emphasizing the plurality and hierarchy of masculinities, and their collective and dynamic character. Global forces such as urbanization, migration, financial crises, political upheavals, expanded educational and employment opportunities as well as old and new media and information technologies are all challenging and expanding the boundaries of what it means to be a man in the Middle East today. The proposed panel seeks to discuss the future of the conceptual character of the "man question" and concrete forms taken by men through the lens of marriage, family, and community life. The orientation of men, agency, and practice that this panel will bring forward aims to sustain and perhaps refresh what we propose to be the distinction of anthropology's legacy- namely, the exploration of human social and cultural imagination in all its diversity and uncertainty. Papers will address Muslim men´s efforts in their engagements with everyday life commitments, nurturing practices, and contemporary responses to local and global transformations. In addition, discourses of love and care (for children, wives, elders, companions, etc) will be explored in detail through presentations focusing on Muslim populations in Arab countries. Papers will have clearly stated methodologies, and will be embedded in rich theoretical and conceptual analysis about masculinities and the anthropological study of Muslim men in the Arab world.