S10_05
Aims of Japanese Language Teachers' Associations in Europe: suggestions from the study on Japanese Language Teachers' Associations in Europe in Spain, France and Belgium

Convenors:
Yuko Suzuki (Language Centre (CSIM) of the University Complutense of Madrid)
Chair:
Yuko Suzuki
Discussant:
Naoko Sakurai, Nozomi Takahashi
Section:
Japanese Language Education
Location:
Torre B, Piso 3, Auditório 2
Start time:
31 August, 2017 at 11:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

(1) How have the associations in Spain, France and Belgium come to be? (2) What have the members learnt and what do they expect from their associations in Spain, France and Belgium? (3) Where are the associations headed in the future?

Long abstract:

Today there are about 30 Japanese Language Teachers' Associations in Europe but they have not had clear ideas about each other. Over the past 30 years learning methods and learners' needs at Japanese language classes have changed, while these associations that support Japanese language teachers have also changed with the times. In particular, The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) devised in 2001 was a turning point in Japanese language teaching in Europe, with many workshops and study groups on the principles and practice of the CEFR being conducted around Europe. Despite this, there have been few discussions since the transnational panel discussion on Japanese Teachers' Associations in Europe ("What can the Teachers' Associations offer in terms of knowledge sharing?") at the 9th EAJS International Conference held in Lyon in 2004. With the development in ICT facilitating communication that transcends time and space today, we need to reconsider how the associations should be operated in the future, not only looking at our own association, but also the current situation of associations in the other countries. After members of the Japanese Language Teachers' Association in Spain were given a questionnaire (Suzuki & Kondō. "The Significance of the Japanese Teachers' Association in Spain (APJE), from the perspectives of teachers' professional development", Japanese Language Education in Europe 20, in printing) last year, the same questionnaire was also given to members of associations in Belgium and France for case study to compare the three associations through text mining. This panel will be presented in three parts, while considering the future of Japanese Language Teachers' Associations in Europe: (1) How have the associations in Spain, France and Belgium come to be? (2) What have the members learnt and what do they expect from their associations in Spain, France and Belgium? (3) Where are the associations headed in the future?