S10_04
Peace and language education (2): possibilities of critical content-based instruction (CCBI)

Convenors:
Shinji Sato (Princeton University)
Sei Miwa (Hamburg University)
Discussant:
Shinji Sato
Stream:
Japanese Language Education
Location:
Torre B, Piso 3, T13
Start time:
31 August, 2017 at 14:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

This panel discusses why the Critical Content-Based Instruction (Sato et al. 2015) is more important than ever by connecting two panels and providing many concrete examples. In this Panel, we introduce research and teaching practices of Japanese language education to create a peaceful world.

Long abstract:

Why do we need critical thinking in higher education? Why do we have to think deeply and critically? The Critical Content-Based Instruction (CCBI) (Sato et al. 2015) does not consider critical thinking important simply because it facilitates the in-depth analysis of objects valued in higher education. Instead it holds that critical perspectives push people to question existing frameworks and change them as needed, and are therefore indispensable to building their future and that of their communities. Critical perspectives are also important to create peaceful communities and world. In our panel, we think that goals of language education are not limited to acquire a target language but create future with the next generation through language education. This point was clearly expressed in CCBI. We would like to discuss why this vision is more important than ever by connecting two panels and providing many concrete examples. In this Panel (2), followed by examples in the Panel (1), we introduce research and teaching practices of Japanese language education to create a peaceful world. Presentation 1 reports "Political Education (politische Bildung)," which was born in Germany to build a democratic nation after the World War II and then discusses what Language Education can learn from Political Education. It also provides implication with "heritage language" education. Presentation 2 analyzes narratives by junior high school students in Miyako Island in Okinawa Prefecture from theories in language learning and identity (Hosokawa & Miyo 2012). We discuss how reexamining critically the relationship between Miyako language and a standard Japanese (hyojungo) can contribute to create a peaceful Europe or world. In Presentation 3 introduces an advanced-level Japanese course, "War and Peace," which was offered at an Italy university. This course was created based on the critical pedagogy approach (Freire 1968). Finally we reexamine all presented examples from the CCBI point of view and discuss how the CCBI approach is helpful to create peaceful communities and world.