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P26b


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Unsettling 'gender' within research, policy and practice II 
Convenors:
Rebecca Gordon (University of Birmingham)
Rishita Nandagiri (London School of Economics and Political Science)
Mirna Guha (Anglia Ruskin University)
Tina Wallace
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Stream:
Policy and practice
Format:
Experimental
Sessions:
Wednesday 30 June, 10:00-11:45 (UTC+1)

Short Abstract:

This panel explores the impact of research, policy and practice in gender and development on: Gender regimes, relations and norms, racialised inequalities and white fragility and conceptualisations of gender. It questions what it means to 'unsettle' gender and development discourses and practice.

Long Abstract

2020 was the 25th anniversary of the Beijing Platform for Action, an event that was arguably a milestone for women's rights. However, many were hoping to promote a more radical agenda, particularly women's networks in the Global South. Since then, the approaches to gender and development (G&D) have evolved and shifted, but debates about what constitutes a 'radical' agenda in G&D remain. On this anniversary, it is important to critically assess the progress of the key ideas and actions, and their role in challenging/reinforcing the status quo. The pandemic and much-needed focus on systematic racism and white supremacy within the development sector has underlined the urgent need to interrogate the impact of feminist research, policy and practice, and practices of G&D organisations and groups on:

• Gender regimes, relations and norms

• Racialised inequalities and white fragility

• Conceptualisations of gender

This panel invites contributions (of 10 minutes) in any form (short presentations, posters, pecha kucha, zines, etc) which examine:

• What it means to 'unsettle' G&D discourses and practice.

• What remains 'radical' within G&D discourses, interventions and research.

• Entanglement of certain concepts within wider discourses of G&D, such as 'agency' 'empowerment' 'victimhood' 'power' and 'resistance'.

• Whether 'gender' alone is enough and/or necessary to advance the rights of marginalised groups globally.

• How G&D scholarship and practice address the intersections of 'gender' with 'race', class, caste, ability, religion, sexuality, etc., within inequalities.

• How to centre and represent marginalised voices, including in relation to Covid-19.

Accepted papers: