Accepted paper:

Child labour in cocoa production in Ghana: fiction or fact?

Authors:

Daniella Delali Sedegah (University of Energy and Natural Resources)
Benzies Isaac Adu-Okoree (Presbyterian University College, Ghana )

Paper short abstract:

The present study sought to ascertain the reality of the involvement of children in cocoa production constituting "child Labour". Specifically, the study investigated whether the involvement of children in cocoa production kept them from schooling and academic progression.

Paper long abstract:

Child labour in cocoa production in West Africa became an issue in the late 2000 especially foreign media leading to the promulgation of the ILO Convention 182. This study sought to ascertain the reality of the involvement of children in cocoa production constituting "Child Labour" in 12 cocoa producing districts in Ghana. The study took into cognisance the traditional mode of training of future cocoa farmers to ensure sustainability of the industry. The study used interpretivist approach which allowed those being investigated to interpret the world around them as they felt. The study found that children of all farming households were involved in ion the larger; the land holding of the farming household, the higher the propensity to use children in farm work; Children largely work on household farms; Saturday was the most common days children went to farm; Children worked between 3-4 hours not counting travelling time. Reasons for using children in: farming were the high cost of scarce Wage-labour; a means of training children in the art of cocoa production; Mode of cocoa production was largely peasant that depended on household labour; the children are assured of meals for the day; their needs were met by the relatives they live with from proceeds; children learn skills and experience in farming. The study concludes that the involvement of children in cocoa production in Ghana does not constitute child labour and recommends the recognition of cultural relativism in prescription of global policies and protocols.

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