P55
Migration, life transitions and socio-political inequalities [Migration, Development and Social Change Study Group]

Convenors:
Katie Wright (University of East London)
Pia Jolliffe (University of Oxford )
Caroline Oliver (University of Oxford)
Location:
Oscar Wilde Room (Magdalen College)
Start time:
13 September, 2016 at 14:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

This workshop examines the linkages between life transitions, migration and socio-political inequalities. The focus is on relationality, linked lives and intersectionality. It explores life transitions that may be experienced for example as children, in adolescence, in adulthood or by older people.

Long abstract:

This workshop examines the linkages between life transitions, migration and socio-political inequalities. It contributes to the existing research on how gender ideologies and practices transform as people move across borders using three key concepts - thinking relationally, moving beyond individual outcomes to consider 'linked lives' and addressing intersectionality - since migrants cross multiple boundaries beyond the geographical including age, race and gender. Intersecting inequalities form part of the socio-political context that patterns migration processes and outcomes. The focus is on life transitions as a broad category of study in relation to mobility. These may be experienced in families as children, in adolescence, in adulthood or by older people (e.g. becoming a parent, being widowed or ageing - processes shaped by culture and socio-political context). Life transitions may also be focused on other areas that go beyond the family or inter-generational relations, for example, in the domain of work, including linkages between production and reproduction. The existing literature on gender and migration has examined how gender (i) influences migration such as the feminization of migration; (ii) how it shapes and patterns migration processes including how far migration decisions are affected by gendered norms in home country; (iii) the gendered nature of labour markets of receiving countries and (iv) their impact on gender roles, ideologies and divisions of labour; (v) whether ideas around motherhood/ fatherhood are maintained or transformed via migration. This panel seeks to extend this research by examining the intersection of life transitions, socio-political inequalities and mobility.