P06
The politics of children and young people in development

Convenors:
Kirrily Pells (UCL Institute of Education)
Vicky Johnson (Goldsmiths, University of London)
Location:
Room 8 (Examination Schools)
Start time:
13 September, 2016 at 11:00
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

The panel explores interconnections between poverty, inequality, fragile environments, intergenerational relationships and actions of children and youth. Analysis draws on research and practice on collaborations, re-workings or resistance to formal or informal processes of development and rights.

Long abstract:

This panel seeks to understand how politics and the political shape the everyday lives of children and youth living in situations of poverty, inequality and insecurity. Going beyond global/local dichotomies the panel invites papers exploring the myriad ways in which children and young people's lives are shaped by the interconnections between structural inequality, fragile environments, intergenerational relationships and the actions of children and young people in navigating these rapidly changing and uncertain terrains. In particular, we welcome analysis from research and practice on children and young people's collaborations, re-workings or resistance to formal or informal discourses and processes of development and rights, and the ways in which examining the complexities of children's lives can better inform theory and practice. Strengthening dialogue between different disciplinary perspectives (such as politics, development studies, the sociology of childhood and youth and children's geographies) the panel aims to bring new theoretical, empirical and practical insights to challenge the marginalization of children and young people both within societies and mainstream development praxis. To this end we welcome papers based on either research and/or reflections on practice, including but not limited to studies with children and youth living in poverty, conflict or post-conflict contexts, as well as those migrating within and between borders and street-connected children and young people.