LL-FWF01
Foodways in motion: food sovereignty, producer movements and living traditions
Convenors:
Frédéric Duhart (Mondragon University )
F. Xavier Medina (Universitat Obsrta de Catalunya (UOC))
Chair:
Frédéric Duhart
Stream:
Living landscapes: Food and Water Flows/Paysages vivants: Flots d'aliments et d'eau
Location:
DMS 1120
Start time:
2 May, 2017 at 13:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

The Commission on the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition proposes consideration of the theme Foodways in motion. We invite to study the producer/consumer movements and the individual initiatives linked with the quest for food sovereignty and their impact on the dynamics of the eating habits.

Long abstract:

The Commission on the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition proposes consideration of the theme Foodways in motion: food sovereignty, producer movements and living traditions. We believe this topic provides stimulating opportunities to think about an exciting dimension of our changing world: the rise of movements and the burgeoning number of individual actions linked with the quest for a real "food sovereignty" in the South as in the North. Of course, this last concept is suggestive of La via campesina. We can read it as an invitation to study the wants, the struggles and the successes/failures of the peasant movements around world. More or less formal, these communities often involve the body in the activism: peasant marches, land occupations, hunger strikes. Peasant movements stricto sensu are not the only type of communities in taking action to defend local forms of agriculture and food supply. A growing number of producers develop collective strategies to protect local foods, and by this way, to create or to maintain economic activity in their native area. Others groups take up the challenge of alternative agriculture or alternative relationships with the consumers. There are also individual initiatives towards certain idea of the food sovereignty, such as chefs who decide to change the world from their kitchens. The culinary profession can appear to be strategic because its intermediary position between producers and consumers. Nevertheless, consumers also develop their own strategies to maintain their eating traditions or to break with them, before inventing new ones: tradition is alive.