RM-CPV03
Movement and stasis: physical mobility and access to public spaces
Convenors:
Laurel Bossen (McGill University)
Hill Gates (Central Michigan University)
Stream:
Relational movements: Crossroads, Places and Violences/Mouvements relationnels: Carrefours, Lieux et Violences
Location:
FSS 1006
Start time:
3 May, 2017 at 8:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Constraints on personal mobility have been instruments of social control across time and cultures. By considering examples of control and exclusion of "others" - women, ethnic, and social minorities - from public spaces, we explore the ways differences are magnified and inequalities perpetuated.

Long abstract:

Constraints on personal mobility have been instruments of social control across time and cultures. By considering examples of control and exclusion of "others" - women, ethnic, and social minorities - from public spaces, we explore the ways differences are magnified and inequalities perpetuated. Differences in ability to move around in public, outside the home, and outside the neighborhood, and to access places offering wider knowledge and resources, have been experienced through a wide range of disabling and enabling mechanisms. Such mechanisms have included footbinding, different dress requirements such as veiling, and a wide range of ethnic, color, gender and social prescriptions that limit access to public places. These mechanisms can affect the confidence with which an individual can go outdoors and walk to school, to work, or to market; the safety or danger individuals experience when driving, riding buses or trains, seeking places to eat, access to public washrooms and sanitary amenities, or finding secure guest houses or accommodations. We would like to explore differences in the range of movement beyond the home, and the ways in which types of personal movement by day or by night, become "safer" modes for diverse types of people in rural and urban settings and societies. We explore the constraints and challenges in striving to make greater movement a possibility and an opportunity for individuals and groups to participate in public life.