MB-MT06
Medical travels, technology flows and non-communicable disease control in Africa
Convenors:
Benson Mulemi (The Catholic University of Eastern Africa)
Charles Olang'o (Maseno University)
Chair:
Prof. Benson A. Mulemi
Stream:
Moving bodies: Medical Travels/Corps mouvants: Trajets médicaux
Location:
FSS 4015
Start time:
3 May, 2017 at 8:30
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

Medical travels and Non-Communicable Disease care resource flows engender and embody social inequities due to uneven distribution of health care resources. The panel will discuss how global, national and regional flows of health care resources shape management of non-communicable diseases in Africa.

Long abstract:

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), particularly cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and chronic respiratory diseases threaten to reach epidemic levels in Africa by 2030. This coincides with increasing treatment travels and flows of medical technology and expertise from Western and Asian countries. Help-seeking movements and flow of care resources imply issues in African health systems' responsiveness. Intra-country public to private sector and global south-north brain drain exacerbate health systems' fragility in the face of the double burden of infectious and non-communicable diseases. Medical travels and NCD care resource flows engender and embody social inequities due to uneven distribution of health care resources. This panel will discuss how global, national and regional flows of health care resources shape management of non-communicable diseases in Africa. It aims at inspiring debate on the wider social, economic and political contexts of NCD management and their consequences for societal well-being in African countries. Individual, micro level patient care needs and intermediate socio-medical aspects associated with health seeking trajectories for chronic diseases will be discussed. The panel welcomes analyses of factors associated with the flow of and access to NCD care resources in Africa considering national and international contexts of medical technology, essential drugs and medical labour flows. The central questions are: to what extent do medical resource flows for NCD control in Africa meet patient care and societal well-being needs? How do NCD care resource flows and associated travel of health care actors; including patients, depict national, regional and global social injustice?