RM-CPV05
Remembering and understanding the Armenian genocide as a possible method to stop and prevent contemporary genocide
Convenors:
Nasim Basiri (Bucharest University)
Alan Whitehorn (Royal Military College of Canada)
Stream:
Relational movements: Crossroads, Places and Violences/Mouvements relationnels: Carrefours, Lieux et Violences
Location:
TBT 309
Start time:
4 May, 2017 at 8:30
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

The panel will highlight several key aspects of genocide such as gender, the role of the military and paramilitary forces, ideologically-driven revisionist state history and genocide denial and how genocide is understood, remembered and represented in the arts.

Long abstract:

The Armenian Genocide is often described as a prototype for other genocides of the 20th century. The Armenian massacres occurred in the Ottoman Empire (now Turkey) during WW I and the immediate post-war years. From a population of just over two million persons, a million and half Armenians perished from forced mass deportations, starvation, disease and massacres. The legal term 'crimes against humanity' emerged in 1915 during the efforts of the world leaders to 'describe the indescribable'. The Polish jurist Raphael Lemkin was profoundly moved by such mass deportations and killings and eventually created the term genocide. Unfortunately, the subsequent decades of the 20th and 21st centuries have witnessed even more state-sponsored mass atrocities that have included war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. Often the three sets of criminal acts are intertwined for complex reasons. This panel raises key questions on how genocide is understood, remembered and represented in the arts (literature, film, paintings, songs and other media). The panel will highlight several key aspects of genocide such as gender, the role of the military and paramilitary forces, ideologically-driven revisionist state history and genocide denial. The panel notes the interdisciplinary nature of genocide studies and encourages anthropological and ethnographic researchers to utilize their analytical frameworks to study the enormous and multi-dimensional impact of genocide.