LL-AE03
Indigenous cultural landscape in biospheres
Convenors:
Maralusiddaiah Halasur Matt (Anthropological Survey of India)
Appaji Gowda (Karnataka State Open University)
Stream:
Living landscapes: Affective Ecologies/Paysages vivants: Écologies affectives
Location:
FSS 1006
Start time:
5 May, 2017 at 14:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

Traditional knowledge provides the best way of identifying Indigenous cultural landscapes. An on-going oral tradition and continuing traditional practices sustain interaction between people and the land.

Long abstract:

The focus of this panel is about the Indigenous cultural landscape in Biospheres and how it is entangled relationships with combined works of nature and humankind, they express a long and intimate relationship between peoples and their natural environment. Biospheres are reflect specific techniques of land use that guarantee and sustain biological diversity. Others, associated in the minds of the communities with powerful beliefs and artistic and traditional customs, embody an exceptional spiritual relationship of indigenous people with nature.Cultural landscapes cultivated terraces on lofty mountains, gardens, sacred places testify to the creative genius, social development and the imaginative and spiritual vitality of humanity. They are part of their collective identity. Intimate knowledge of the area its landforms, waters, species and spirits derives from traditional wisdom and sustained observation of weather patterns, water quality, animal behavior and plant growth while journeying in the seasonal round. Following animal movements for hunting and trapping, seeking the best fishing grounds, collecting plants and saps for food and medicine, camping, gathering with kin, and holding ceremonies. Reciprocal relationships with animals, plants and spirits of the area, constructed through long and close association, are reflected in traditional practices. Traditional and indigenous knowledge provides the best way of identifying Indigenous people's cultural landscapes. An on-going oral tradition and continuing traditional practices sustain interaction between people and the land. Locations or features in the landscape with traditional place names, often connected by routes travelled, act as memory tools for stories about a people's relationship with the land.