WIM-GF05
Technology, movement, and the cultural production of meaning
Convenors:
Gabriela Vargas-Cetina (Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan)
Steffan Igor Ayora Diaz (Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán)
Carmen Bueno (Universidad Iberoamericana)
Chair:
Gustavo Lins Ribeiro
Stream:
Worlds in motion: Global Flows/Mondes en mouvement: Flots globaux
Location:
FSS 1030
Start time:
3 May, 2017 at 8:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

How do technologies shape and are culturally shaped by creativity, effectiveness, innovation, spatial and temporal movement, and aesthetics? We invite papers that examine the co-construction of technology and cultural practices, in any realm of life and across groups and locations.

Long abstract:

Current theories focusing on concepts such as "technicity," "technoscience" and "technological change" begin with the premise that humans and technology have always been inextricably entwined. From concepts of hybrids and cyborgs, to the notions of technological systems and networks, and technocultural obsolescence and innovation, social theory seeks to shed light on the complex ways in which old and new technologies contribute to shape human practices and are articulated with cultural, political, economic, and multiple global-local phenomena. This session explores technology in the plural, and the ways in which technologies shape and are culturally shaped by creativity, effectiveness, innovation, spatial and temporal movement, and aesthetics. While today we increasingly associate technology with novelty, movement and speed, in fact some types of technology, new and old, have rooted people in particular places in the recent past and continue to fix technological hubs and peoples to particular spaces and groups. From commodity production to food, art, flows of people and social protest, technologies play a decisive role in the production of goods, the reconfiguration of the social and material environments, the creation and dissemination of representations, the mobilization of affects, and the restructuring of everyday life. Considering that even the same technical and technological tools become significantly different in accordance to where and when they are adopted and used, we invite papers that examine how technology and cultural practices co-construct each other's meanings and uses, in any realm of life and across groups and locations.