RM-LL04
Minority language ideologies on the move
Convenors:
P. Kerim Friedman (National Dong Hwa University)
Tzu-kai Liu (Academia Sinica)
Discussant:
Monica Heller
Stream:
Relational movements: Lively Languages/Mouvements relationnels: Langues vivantes
Location:
VNR 3075
Start time:
6 May, 2017 at 8:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel explores how language ideologies are transformed by the movement of minority language speakers, as well as the movement of discourses about minority languages as they transverse different communities of practice.

Long abstract:

This panel contributes to the growing body of literature on the language ideologies of minority language speakers by exploring what happens when these ideologies move across geographical, political and cultural scapes. By "language ideologies" (Woolard and Schieffelin 1994) we are referring to the beliefs and attitudes people hold about languages, about the people who speak those languages, and about the communicative practices of those speakers. We are interested in how these beliefs and attitudes are affected by two different kinds of movement: the movement of minority language speakers themselves, as well as the movement of discourses about minority languages as they transverse different communities of practice. The first kind of movement is exemplified by the changing language attitudes of minorities who have migrated to large urban centers where their language might gain new meaning as a tool for forging affective ties with other members of their speech community. The second kind of movement can be observed when minority language activists must reframe local ideologies in order to get support from the state. As a result of these movements language ideologies come to be reinterpreted at different geographic and temporal scales (Carr and Lempert 2016). This raises a number of important questions: How do shifts in scale change the perceived relationship of minority languages to the wider linguistic hierarchy? How do language ideologies come to embrace or reject different chronotopes (Silverstein 2005) as a result of these shifts? How are linguistic practices reconfigured as a result of these ideological transformations?