RM-MRB05
Migration in a world of turmoil
Convenors:
Anand Singh (Howard College Campus)
Juan Bustamante (University of Arkansas)
Monica Ibanez Angulo (University of Burgos)
Stream:
Relational movements: Migration, Refugees and Borders/Mouvements relationnels: Migration, régugiés et frontières
Location:
FSS 1030
Start time:
5 May, 2017 at 8:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Under the rubric of migration, key components to political chaos, mass exoduses, and a prevalent search by long standing citizens for more stable socio-political environments provide a basis for or increased mobility across international boundaries.

Long abstract:

Global economic recession and political turmoil in countries such as Libya, Iraq, Afghanistan, Egypt, Pakistan, Zimbabwe, Malawi, and the Democratic Republic of Congo, among others, have over the last two decades brought about significant instability at all three major boundary levels: nationally, regionally, and globally. This instability now constitutes the most contemporary push factors that are responsible for forced migration. The first set of factors is viewed through the violent contestations and its multiple effects. Fresh insights are required into the push factors of the second decade in the 21st century; and the ways in which regional political establishments, state governments, and local populations are seeking to make their pull factors less attractive to potential migrants. . Fresh insights are required into the push factors of the second decade in the 21st century; and the ways in which regional political establishments, state governments, and local populations are seeking to make their pull factors less attractive to potential migrants. Migratory push factors in the second decade of the 21st century 1. Toning down pull factors as disincentives incentives for migrants 2. Responses from the European Union on migration 3. The BREXIT factor on migration 4. The Middle-east dilemma and unfolding scenarios 5. Failed states and options for migration/South-South Migration 6. USA, Canada and Australia and the future of migration policies 7. Migrants, indigenous populations and reinvented identities 8. Policies and practice as instigators of professional migration 9. The impact of natural disasters and relocation on children, women and households