Body11
Rethinking the anthropology of dance
Convenors:
Georgiana Gore (University of Clermont Auvergne)
Hélène Neveu Kringelbach (University College London)
Discussant:
Michael Houseman (Ecole Pratiques des Hautes Etudes, PSL)
Stream:
Bodies
Format:
Location:
Magdalen Oscar Wilde Room
Start time:
19 September, 2018 at 9:00
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel pays tribute to the late Andrée Grau's engagement with dance as fundamental to human sociality (Grau 2016) and interrogates advancements in the anthropology of dance since Gertrude Kurath's 1960 article Panorama of dance ethnology published in the first volume of Current Anthropology.

Long abstract:

This panel pays tribute to the late Andrée Grau's engagement with dance as cultural and biological phenomenon, fundamental to human sociality (Grau 2016) and interrogates advancements in the anthropology of dance since Gertrude Kurath's programmatic 1960 article Panorama of dance ethnology published in the first volume of Current Anthropology. Indeed, in anthropology, dance has often been examined from two perspectives: as an object of study in its own right, and as a practice the study of which enables understanding of other domains of human activity such as gender, politics, memory, kinship, religion, identity, mobility, health, or cognition. These two perspectives have increasingly come together as anthropologists developed new theoretical tools to approach creative bodies in their social contexts. In this panel, we invite presentations which are ethnographically grounded and/or which engage with theoretically provocative arguments on one or several of the following issues: - How are creative processes articulated in choreographed movement? - How may the study of dance advance our understanding of the relationship between the human and the non-human? - Might a focus on dance help to explore the relationship between movement and cognition? - To what extent does choreographed movement "create" social relationships, and relationships between people and matter? - How do dance practices change over time, and what do these processes say about time and memory in their different forms? - How might the use of technological advances (motion capture, for example) contribute to our understanding of creative bodies in movement?