P26
Everyday negotiations of capitalist temporalities

Convenors:
Alena Thiel (Bayreuth University)
Michael Stasik (Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity)
Location:
Science Site/Maths CM221
Start time:
7 July, 2016 at 9:00
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel explores everyday social practice conducive to produce temporal difference within a time regime of capitalism converging towards 'global' simultaneity. It aims at combining ethnographic analyses of culturally variable co-temporalities with critiques of homochronism.

Long abstract:

If time is invested with power, then the capitalist system of production is currently the dominant force of temporal structuring. Characterized by insistent schedules of production, distribution, exchange and consumption, the homogenizing dictums of capitalist temporalities are both product of temporal synchronizations and source of increasingly synchronized life-times. By taking hold of clock time, capitalist relations impose their clock-controlled codes of sociability onto realms far beyond the iconic assembly line and infiltrate right into the temporal tapestries of everydayness, purportedly on a global scale. Yet as Harootunian (2000) asserts, it is the very realm of everyday life that permits us to negotiate relationships between 'the rhythms and routines reproduced everywhere that capitalism spreads and the lived or local and contingent experiences mediating them'. In this panel, we attend to these resistances by foregrounding everyday social practices honed in on evading, repurposing, delaying, desynchronizing or accelerating the seemingly universalizing thrust of capitalist temporality. We invite contributors to explore emic perspectives on practices conducive to produce temporal difference within a time regime of capitalism converging towards 'global' simultaneity, while recognizing the conflicting nature of polychronic 'coevalness' (Fabian 2002). We particularly call for approaches that combine ethnographic analysis of culturally variable co-temporalities with critiques of homochronic representations of time and (historical) transformation.