P31
"Indigenous" space and local politics

Convenors:
Jenny Lawy (University of Edinburgh)
Takamasa Osawa (University of Edinburgh)
Chair:
Professor Alan Barnard
Discussant:
Professor Kazunobu Ikeya
Location:
Playfair Building, Main Hall
Start time:
21 June, 2014 at 9:00
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel scrutinises the meaning of indigenousness in relation to space. We invite panelists to present research that is located in indigenous space where the local politics of indigenous peoples are foregrounded thus unraveling, undoing and remaking space through which we understand the world.

Long abstract:

This panel scrutinises the meaning of indigenousness in relation to space. Space has a long history in research surrounding indigenous peoples, yet spaces are changing. James Hutton's enduring work from the Enlightenment, that the world is in a constant process of change, has pertinent qualities. Arguably even more so with indigenous people who have a fraught history within anthropological contexts that helped to foster a 'timeless' state. Space helps to define the way one interacts with the world. Norms in part define the space for those within (and without) its boundaries. Individual or collective agendas such as negotiation, pride and performance in local politics may transform space. Space can refer to not only land, but also space where discussion and interaction occurs. Space is the site through which belonging and exclusion, that relate to 'indigenous-ness', play out. In using 'indigenous' we implicate 'indigenous-ness' which is prescribed by 'their' world rather than one defined in relation to laws and rights. So although internationalised indigenous rights are associated with this terminology the panel will explore localised politics rather than political policy. Where do indigenous people present their indigenousness and how does it change the boundaries of space? We invite panellists to present research that is located in indigenous space where the politics of indigenous peoples are foregrounded. We welcome research that deals with the politics of those seeking rights, rather than the rights themselves, thus unravelling, undoing and remaking the space through which we understand the world.