P36
Engagement and disengagement in crisis: anthropology as a mutualist concern

Convenors:
Antónia Pedroso de Lima (ISCTE-IUL / CRIA )
Joao Pina-Cabral (University of Kent)
Discussant:
Dimitrios Theodossopolous (University of Kent)
Location:
Room 3
Start time:
15 April, 2015 at 9:15
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

Economic crisis is spreading throughout Europe. Whilst old institutional frameworks of social support continue to guarantee daily survival, new configurations of mutuality are emerging. The panel will debate the results of the "crisis" and the ways it makes itself known to those who suffer it.

Long abstract:

Economic crisis is spreading throughout Europe, carrying with it the stagnation of public health, of educational, and of cultural services. As an increasingly part of the population is faced with a threat to its daily survival, the old institutional frameworks of social support continue to thrive and new configurations of mutuality are emerging. But silencing, systemic disengagement and denial of mutuality are equally prevalent. This process of "crisis" constitutes a fertile terrain for reflecting upon more general questions: the conditions of sociality, the meaning of labour and citizenship, the nature of social responsibility, the relation between national politics and the global economic system. Ironically, the effects of the "austerity" that produces the crisis become a central terrain for anthropological research just as they become central factors in the life cycle of the younger generations who are faced with increased job insecurity and economic instability. Ethnography rend visible the frameworks of interpersonal and institutional relations that make possible both social support and social de-responsabilization. It analyses the ways in which the crisis affects people and their livelihoods, transforming them, their social networks, and their experienced viewpoints; constituting a critical perspective that overcomes the simplistic dichotomy between particular livelihoods and contemporary capitalism. This panel, we welcome papers dealing with any of the above topics, especially the way in which researcher and researched are deeply intertwined in mutual engagement and disengagement. We want to study the results of the "crisis" and the way it crisis makes itself known to those who suffer it.