P25
What can archaeological data tell us about anthropological realities?
Convenor:
Aleksandar Boskovic (University of Belgrade)
Location:
Wills 1.5
Start time:
7 April, 2009 at 14:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

In recent years, archaeology and anthropology are again connecting with each other, after decades of separation. As we strive more towards interdisciplinarity, it becomes obvious that combining these field can benefit any attempt to understand societies that we try to study.

Long abstract:

In recent years, archaeology and anthropology are again connecting with each other, after decades of separation. Even in the US, with the "four field approach," these disciplines tended to move along separate lines. However, as we strive more towards interdisciplinarity, it becomes obvious that combining these fields can benefit any attempt to understand societies that we try to study. For example, there have been numerous attempts to interpret rituals or religious beliefs of the past, for which we have scarce archaeological data, in light of contemporary historical understanding of these cultures. There have also been attempts to interpret forms of social organization, again, juxtaposing historical and ethno-historical data upon the available archaeological records. The aim of this panel is to look at specific areas all around the world, including (but not limited to) Southeast Europe, Latin America, and Sub-Saharan Africa, where archaeological data do indeed inform our understanding of current ethnographic realities, and to show the usefulness of combining methodologies and approaches that will increase of our understanding of both the past and the present.