Env02
Localizing climate change: global changes - local responses

Convenors:
Paulo Mendes (CRIA-IUL / UTAD)
Thomas Hylland Eriksen (University of Oslo)
Stream:
Environment
Location:
Aula 19
Tuesday 16 April, 9:00-10:45
Tuesday 16 April, 11:15-13:00
Tuesday 16 April, 16:30-18:15

Short abstract:

Climate change is on the political and media agendas, yet it remains elusive in many ways. It is often perceived either as a local change in weather patterns and/or as global phenomena too large to be localised. Papers showing local variations in climate change perceptions are welcomed.

Long abstract:

Climate change is on the political and media agendas, yet it is still an elusive issue. Owing to its regional variability and varying urgency, it is often perceived either as a local change in weather patterns and/or as global phenomena too large to be localised. Papers on the "ethnographic variability of climate change" are welcome, namely those addressing issues of "crisis" on the different regions of the world, relating them to the global picture. Climate change affects people in communities worldwide, but frequently, other understandings are at the forefront locally, such as those related to economy, conflict, migration, cultural identity or local environmental problems. They are undoubtedly interconnected and this should be acknowledged, but at the same time, ethnographies on climate change should also report how matters directly associated with CO2 emissions are fundamental for the comprehension of fast changing social processes, at the local and global levels. Therefore, we are proposing a panel on how people are responding to climate change, either on notorious "effluent locations" (e.g. coal mining, tar sands, large cattle farms, factories), and on "recipient locations" (e.g. polar regions, Pacific islands, seashores). Papers may focus on political and environmental movements, warfare, refugees, migrations, alternative ways of livelihoods, new economies, or, on the contrary, on the lack of awareness of climate change effects (e.g. ground level ozone on natural parks, methane emissions on artificial lakes). Papers may be based on extensive fieldwork, but comparative and theoretical contributions are also welcomed.

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