P094
Creative Art/Anthropology Praxis as Revelation and Resistance
Convenors:
Cathy Greenhalgh
Jennifer Deger (James Cook University)
Eni Bankole-Race (Royal College of Art)
Format:
Panels
Location:
SOAS Senate House - S208
Start time:
3 June, 2018 at 11:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Creative praxis positions anthropologists and artists within a complex matrix of agencies, material conditions, aesthetic organisation, production culture, and technology. This panel calls for practitioner-academics who mark out their own approaches, experiences, situations and settings in relation to praxis as revelation and resistance within the problematics of practice-as-research.

Long abstract:

Creative praxis positions anthropologists and artists within a complex matrix of agencies, material conditions, aesthetic organisation, production culture, and technology. This panel calls for practitioner-academics who mark out their own approaches, experiences, situations and settings in relation to praxis as revelation and resistance within the problematics of practice-as-research. The panel will highlight questions of how understanding moves from tacit towards more explicit articulation (verbal, textual, or physical (embodied); how reflexive experiments with form, modes of pedagogy, creative collaboration and aesthetic organisation broaden capacities for social critique and advocacy, artistic and political citizenship; and distinguishing between practice per se and reflexive practice with intent to positively influence activity within practice-as-research. The renewed relationship between art and anthropology is transforming what counts as knowledge (Grimshaw and Ravetz, Ingold, Schneider and Wright). Practice-led research methods reconfigure disciplinary expectations of form, process, and output—highlighting the generative potential of co-creativity, sensuous encounter and formal innovation. People have ‘praxis needs…to become a self, maintain a self and develop a self through expressive activity’, but this ‘process is fragmented within capitalist work organisation’ (Carsprecken in Zou and Trueba, 2002: 63). In artistic and academic life we experience increasing infrastructural and institutional change. Politics and aesthetics exist in intimate mutuality; affected by positions of difference, power, and risk. While our work may enable new forms of resistance or resilience, it does so in complex, fraught and often precarious ways. But pressure may impel us to find unique paths through the gaps. We wish to recast a claim for praxis as a form of enlightenment and revelation and impetus to new modalities of thinking, knowing and resistance.