Pol36
Collective action in disruptive times: mobilizing against neoliberal politics

Convenors:
Antje Daniel (University of Vienna)
Carin Runciman (University of Johannesburg)
Stream:
Politics and International Relations
Location:
Appleton Tower, Seminar Room 2.11
Session slots:
1
Wednesday 12 June, 14:15 - 16:00

Short abstract:

The panel addresses collective actions before and after the 2008 global financial crisis and asks to what extent collective actions in Africa has been a part of global mobilizations against neoliberalism and to what extent does it reflect the particularities of its context.

Long abstract:

Before and after the 2008 global financial crisis, collective action has been rising across the continent. While each national context reflects its own political and economic concerns - from demanding regime change to challenging governments for access to social services - what links these diverse protests is how they are shaped by global neoliberal capital and attempts to disrupt it. While the African continent has often been estranged from discussions of the post-2010 'global' protest wave, the repertoires of contention like occupations of space, student protests or claims for the right to the city echo transnational protests as well as reflecting traditions of resistance built in the continent. This raises the question, to what extent has collective action in Africa been a part of global mobilizations against neoliberalism and to what extent does it reflect the particularities of its context? This panel seeks to answer this and other related questions; how are politics against neoliberalism embedded in movement practice and politics? To what extent are movements drawing on repertoires of past collective action or developing new ones? Do these movements use non-violent or disruptive strategies? We want to address the connections, disconnections and interrelations of collective actions, their genealogy, their transnational interlinkages or ambiguity between neoliberal politics and collective action.