P122


Global scientific encounters: The quest for sustainable research cooperations 
Convenor:
Stefan Skupien (WZB Berlin Social Science Center)
Send message to Convenor
Discussant:
Martin Skrydstrup (Copenhagen Business School)
Format:
Panels
Location:
BS004
Start time:
30 June, 2017 at 14:00 (UTC+0)
Session slots:
1

Short Abstract:

Researchers with interest in science policy analysis and knowledge systems are invited to present case studies and theory development on science cooperations. The aim is to zoom into the research cooperation and ask for specific understandings of sustainability within scientific sub-cultures.

Long Abstract

Within the paradigm of 'knowledge societies' scientific research and science education has become a key to national development and international competitiveness, especially in the post-2015 agenda for sustainable development goals. Research cooperation forms one pillar of such development process, including all disciplines. However, studies and self-reports of participating researchers have often revealed the persistent asymmetries within such cooperations. On the one hand such critique has led to the development of guidelines of fair and equal research among different partners (KFPE 2001). On the other hand, the critique of unequal access to knowledge, uneven spreadth of resources and of hegemonial research concepts remains present (Zingerli 2010, Koehn/Obama 2014).

This panel invites researchers with interest in science policy analysis and knowledge systems to present case studies and theory development on science cooperations since the 1990s. The aim is to zoom into research cooperation and ask for specific understandings of sustainability within scientific subcultures. Participants are welcomed to look at usually underrepresented research cooperation within engineering, the life sciences and ICT but also to ask for specific conditions such as funding structures, institutional and national differences of donor countries and general effects of inclusion/exclusion within a global scientific community.

Accepted papers:

Author:

Claudia Zingerli (Swiss National Science Foundation)

Paper short abstract:

This paper focuses on research collaborations in the early era of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development by drawing on conceptual considerations and practical experiences at the interface of science and development policy.

Paper long abstract:

Building on the sociology of international research partnerships (Zingerli 2010) this paper focuses on research collaborations in the early era of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, particularly taking into account the Sustainable Development Goal 17 on global partnership for sustainable development. Adopting a funders' perspective, it puts forward three questions: 1) What are the implications of institutional, historical and social circumstances for research partnerships to emerge in the 21st century? 2) How do structural and institutional conditions shape research collaborations, and 3) what are the prospects and impacts of increasingly globalised research encounters?

This paper draws on conceptual considerations and practical experiences at the interface of science and development policy.

Author:

Thomas Laely (University of Z├╝rich)

Paper short abstract:

Museums are important engines of research and knowledge production, all above university museums. They can contribute to making research from Africa more visible and accessible. How is the potential of museums in sub-Saharan Africa and of transcontinental networks to be assessed in this respect?

Paper long abstract:

Besides university and research institutes, journals and books, publishing houses and repositories, museums are important engines of research and knowledge production, all above scientific and university museums. How is the potential of the African "museum-scape" and of transcontinental networks to be assessed in this respect? To what extent can they contribute to making research from Africa more visible and accessible? This paper intends to present a current trilateral museum research partnership between Africa and Europe and to analyse the actual and potential contributions in research from the African side as well as the premises, conditions and modalities of its engagement with other involved partner institutions. It highlights amongst other the findings of an international conference on museum cooperation between Africa and Europe held in December 2016 (www.musethno.uzh.ch/en/conference2016), elaborating on knowledge production and dissemination as well as on the (pre-) conditions and requirements of larger long-term partnerships. Which research forms, outcomes and outputs are conceivable? How about publications, exhibitions, databases, digital copies, websites, staff exchange and tandems? What goes along with collaborations and "knowledge partnerships" with institutions in the North?

Author:

Stefan Skupien (WZB Berlin Social Science Center)

Paper short abstract:

This paper discusses examples of establishing criteria for equal and fair research partnerships. Starting from the Swiss Commission for Research with Developing Countries (1998), it develops a framework to understand the efforts to counter negative effects in asymmetric relationships.

Paper long abstract:

Research partnerships between North and South have received new attention with the emergence of paradigms such as the knowledge societies or research for development. Large sums have supported collaborative research between mostly unequal partners.

This paper develops a story by drawing from different experiences to define equal and fair research cooperation. It starts with the development of the criteria brought forward by the Swiss Commission for Research with Developing Countries of 1998 and follows several traits to contemporary efforts of different funders in Europe. Such criteria offer concentrated insights into the normative dimensions of research cooperation.

Author:

Hikabasa Halwiindi (University of Zambia)

Paper short abstract:

This presentation is a case study on how a post-doctoral research fellowship program resulted into the creation of a research network in order to sustain the achievements. The mutual responsibilities of the north and south partners are highlighted.

Paper long abstract:

Research partnerships between the North and South have produced positive results in terms of scientific productivity, research quality, innovative capacity, capacity building and improvements in processes, services and products. However, there have been concerns on how these achievements can be sustained in the long term in the research sites and beyond.

This paper presents the experiences of how a Post-doctoral research fellowship program (The European Foundations Initiative against Neglected Tropical Diseases [EFINTD]) resulted in the creation of the African Research Network for Neglected Tropical diseases (ARNTD). The paper highlights answers to questions like: (i) What were the benefits of the EFINTD? (ii) How have these gains been translated into ARNTD? (iii) What are the challenges in sustaining these gains under the ARNTD?