B09
Feminist figures: crafting intersections in theory and practice

Convenors:
Joan Haran (Cardiff University)
Kate O'Riordan (University of Sussex )
Stream:
Art and craft of joining and keeping things together
Location:
Welcome Centre Lecture Theatre 3
Start time:
25 July, 2018 at 13:00
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel engages with feminist figures in two senses: the figurations that feminists have crafted to provoke innovative engagements with technoscience and the widely cited feminist figures whose work gathers up their readers and audiences in collaborative projects of theory-making and practice.

Long abstract:

This panel engages with feminist figures in two senses: the figurations that feminist science studies scholars, speculative writers, and environmental activists (for example) have crafted to provoke innovative engagements with science and technology, and the extensively cited feminist figures whose work gathers up their readers and audiences in collaborative projects of theory-making and practice. These projects might be called worlding and / or staying with the trouble as they harness the openness to possibility of speculation to rigorous attention to the myriad challenges posed by social and environmental injustice. Feminist figures in the first sense include the cat's cradle (Haraway), diffraction (Haraway, Barad) and the spiral dance (Starhawk, Haraway), all of which are used to imagine and elaborate feminist modes of knowledge creation. Feminist figures, in the second sense might include, for example, Karen Barad, Octavia Butler, Shulamith Firestone, Donna Haraway, Starhawk, Isabelle Stengers. However, the panel also encourages work that articulates orientations towards less well known figures and brings new material to these constellations. Papers are invited that focus on making and sustaining alliances across and around these figures, including broader collective identities such as (post)cyberfeminism, feminist materialism, feminist speculation. Contributions may focus on makers, learning and collaborative work, feminist genealogies, and the work of mending and repair in theoretical and practical registers. Figures may operate to bring together different communities, or produce difference and disturbance. Panellists may discuss the ways in which these feminist figures meet in their own work or illuminate consequential meetings in their research sites.