NomadIT Conference Suite

DSA, 2019: DSA2019: Opening up Development

Open University, Milton Keynes, 19/06/2019 – 21/06/2019

Panel

(I2)
Religions and Climate Action [paper]
Location
Date and Start Time [TBD] at [TBD]
Sessions [TBD]

Convenors

  • Emma Tomalin (University Of Leeds) email
  • Madiha Sadiq (Humanitarian Academy for Development) email

Mail All Convenors

Short abstract

While religious traditions might appear to call for restraint in the use of natural resources, applying this in practice towards environmental protection is less straightforward. This panel invites papers that examine the role of religions towards achieving SDG 13 (Climate Action). [Religions & Development SG]

Long abstract

While religious traditions might appear to emphasise that the natural world is sacred and to call for restraint in the use of natural resources, applying this in practice towards environmental protection is less straightforward. Sustainable Development Goal 13 calls for 'Climate Action' and target 13.3 to 'Build knowledge and capacity to meet climate change'. Considering the highly religious nature of many Global South settings as well as their ecological vulnerability, this panel will examine the relationships between religions and climate action. What role might religious perspectives be able to play in addressing climate change? Alternatively, in what ways might religious beliefs and practices present barriers to climate justice? What do policy makers need to know about the religion-environment nexus in order to support local communities in developing culturally appropriate responses to climate change? What role are local faith actors playing in providing moral guidance to encourage custodianship and sustainable practices? How successful have faith-based initiatives been in inspiring action against climate change and what can be learnt from these examples?

We invite papers that address these questions and are particularly interested in papers that have a practical focus and examine the role of religions towards achieving SDG 13. We need to move beyond purely theological/theoretical accounts of how religions might impact upon people's relations to the natural world and instead generate research that can help policy makers appreciate the 'nuances and complexity inherent in religious values for motivating environmental action' (Sachdeva 2016: 11).

This panel is closed to new paper proposals.

Papers

The panel has no papers to display. Only accepted papers will be shown here.

This panel is closed to new paper proposals.